IAFNS Beltsville Webinar: Flavonoids

Recorded December 1, 2022

IAFNS is a Continuing Professional Education (CPE) provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR). CDR Credentialed Practitioners will receive 1.5 Continuing Professional Education Units (CPEUs) for completion of this recorded webinar until December 1, 2025.

Description:

USDA Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center has an active program to improve understanding of the role of flavonoid-rich foods in promoting health, addressing the issue from multiple angles. In this session, research will be presented on how flavonoid-rich berries affect bioenergetics in humans, as well as how a fruit and vegetable supplemented diet rich in flavonoids impacts host health by modulating gut microbiome composition and transcriptome response in a translational animal model. We will also describe our recently released flavonoid data products designed for use with national dietary data and how these resources can be used to inform dietary guidance for flavonoids and advance knowledge about flavonoid-health relationships. Finally, to further support the links between diet and health, as well as cross-talk between USDA’s FoodData Central and other databases, our databases have been expanded to include common, unique identifiers, which will expand the utility of data on food content of flavonoids and other compounds.

Webinar program:

Overview of the USDA Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center
Naomi K. Fukagawa

Flavonoid Values for USDA Survey Foods and Beverages 2017-2018: A New Data Tool to
Promote Research on Flavonoid-health Relationships
Rhonda Sebastian

How Eating the RDA for Fruits and Vegetables effects Microbiome, Gut health, Gut
immunology: Fruit/Vegetable Research with Pigs
Gloria Solano-Aguilar, PhD

Berry/Flavonoid Research Focusing on Human Health Outcomes and Cellular Bioenergetics
Janet Novotny, PhD

FoodData Central Work Allowing Links to Databases such as Flavonoids
Kyle McKillop

Commission on Dietetic Registration Performance Indicators:

  • 6.2.3 Analyzes and interprets data to form valid conclusions and to make recommendations.
  • 6.8.1 Masters and maintains current and evidence-based knowledge within subject areas.
  • 8.1.3 Evaluates the chemical nature and composition of food on food quality, acceptability, and compatibility to inform product development, menu planning and food preparation techniques.

If a CEU certificate is needed, please complete the survey

IAFNS USDA Beltsville: Botanicals and the Impact of Growing Conditions and Food Preparation on Food Composition

Recorded November 15, 2022

IAFNS is a Continuing Professional Education (CPE) provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR). CDR Credentialed Practitioners will receive 1.5 Continuing Professional Education Units (CPEUs) for completion of this recorded webinar until November 15, 2025.

Description:

Plant foods are important part of the human diet. They contain various nutrients and large groups of secondary metabolites as bioactive compounds. Food compositions in plant foods are affected by many factors such as genetics, environment, management, and preparation/processing. In this section, the changes of different nutrients/secondary metabolites from strawberries, lettuces, broccoli, sweet corn, and coffee will be presented in response to the different growing conditions, pre/post-harvest management, and food preparation and processing methods. In addition, a botanical database based on mass spectrometric data will be introduced and it will be a very important resource used by common users and professionals in human nutrition research.

Webinar program:

Overview of the USDA Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center
Naomi K. Fukagawa

Botanical Databases
Pei Chen, PhD

Capturing the Secondary Metabolites Variability in Fruits and Vegetables with Different Growing Conditions
Jianghao Sun, PhD

Effects of Food Processing on the Carotenoids in Sweet Corn
Xianli Wu, PhD

Coffee Chemistry: Complexity of Coffee Compounds and Impact of Roasting Condition
Jae Park, PhD

Commission on Dietetic Registration Performance Indicators:

  • 4.2.5 Analyzes and synthesizes information and identifies new information, patterns and findings.
  • 6.2.3 Analyzes and interprets data to form valid conclusions and to make recommedentions.
  • 6.8.1 Demonstrates knowledge of nutrient requirements throughout the lifespan, and their role in health promotion and disease prevention.
  • 8.1.3 Evaluates the chemical nature and composition of food on food quality, acceptability, and compatibility to inform development, menu planning and food preparation techniques.

If a CEU certificate is needed, please complete the survey

USDA Beltsville Webinar: Complex Carbohydrates and the Complexity of Carbohydrates

Recorded November 3, 2022

IAFNS is a Continuing Professional Education (CPE) provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR). CDR Credentialed Practitioners will receive 1.0 Continuing Professional Education Units (CPEUs) for completion of this recorded webinar until November 3, 2025.

Description:

Investigations of the biological efficacy and mechanisms of action for dietary fiber (DF) in human health and nutrition are complicated because, unlike many nutritional components which are discrete compounds, DF represents a diverse set of polymeric materials.  Variations in monomeric composition, degree of polymerization, and structural motifs arising from food preparation all impact the digestibility and probiotic effect of different dietary fiber sources. Scientists at the USDA Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center (BNHRC) seek to address issues related to these challenges by performing interdisciplinary collaborative research. Their preliminary studies are highlighted in this presentation.

Dr. Dave Luthria will describe his work on high-throughput fiber analysis using automated Ankom Technology, including highlighting the challenges associated with commonly used methodologies for fiber analysis. The pros and cons of different methods used for fiber analysis will be reviewed. Dr. Allen Smith will present his work on examining the biological effects of a food ingredient, resistant potato starch, on the gut microbiome and its impact on inflammation in rodent models. Dr. Thomas Wang will describe his work in a diet-induced-obesity rodent model where different resistant starch levels from cooked rice varietals were used to determine the biological efficacy and mechanism of action for resistant starch in a whole food.  Finally, Dr. Michael Bukowski will close by describing the future of complex carbohydrate analysis using a combination analytical chemistry and polymer analysis techniques.

Webinar program:

Overview of the USDA Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center
Naomi K. Fukagawa

Research Advances and Challenges in Dietary Fiber Analyses
Dave Luthria, PhD

Research Plans to Improve Carbohydrate Analyses
Mike Bukowski, PhD

Effect of Resistant Starch as an Ingredient on Animal Gut Health
Allen Smith, PhD

Food and Nutrition Research: Carbohydrates in Select Foods, Raw and Processed
Pamela Pehrsson

Rice as a Source of Resistant Starch and Diet Induced Obesity and Gut Microbiome
Tom Wang, PhD

Commission on Dietetic Registration Performance Indicators:

  • 4.1.2 Interprets and integrates evidence-based research and literature in decision-making.
  • 4.2.6 Integrates relevant information with previous learning, experience, professional knowledge, and current practice models.
  • 6.2.3 Analyzes and interprets data to form valid conclusions and to make recommendations.

If a CEU certificate is needed, please complete the survey

USDA Beltsville Webinar: Sources and Intake of Added Sugars in the U.S. Diet

Recorded October 26, 2022

IAFNS is a Continuing Professional Education (CPE) provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR). CDR Credentialed Practitioners will receive 1.5 Continuing Professional Education Units (CPEUs) for completion of this recorded webinar until October 26, 2025.

Description:

Numerous governmental and public health organizations recommend reduced intake of added sugars [defined as sugars that are either added during the processing of foods, or are packaged as such (e.g., a bag of sugar)] due to the adverse health effects associated with excess intake, including risk of obesity, dental caries, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) recommends a dietary pattern that contains <10% of energy from added sugars. Reducing the intake of added sugars in the diet is easier said than done because sweet taste is inherently liked.

This webinar will showcase the research conducted by the USDA-ARS investigating sweet taste perception, measuring sources of sugars in the U.S. food supply, and capturing intake of added sugars among the U.S. population. The event will start with an overview of the sweet taste receptor and how it is conserved across species. Next, the process used by USDA-ARS to measure sugars and added sugars in the food supply will be discussed. Findings from a recent cross-sectional analysis using data collected from What We Eat in America, the dietary intake component of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) will be presented. This analysis focuses on sources of added sugars and dietary patterns among adults that meet or exceed recommended levels of added sugars

Webinar program:

Overview of the USDA Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center
Naomi K. Fukagawa

Comparative Genomics of Sweet Taste Perception
Harry Dawson

Tracking Food and Beverage Intake using WWEIA
Donna Rhodes

Sources of Added Sugars in the Diet
Kelly Higgins

Overview of Sugars and Added Sugars in FoodData Central
Kyle McKillop

Commission on Dietetic Registration Performance Indicators:

  • 8.1.2 Integrates knowledge of biological, physical, and social sciences with knowledge of food and nutrition to make decisions related to nutrition care.
  • 8.1.4 Integrates knowledge of macro- and micronutrients for digestion, absorption and metabolism throughout the lifespan in practice.
  • 8.1.5 Demonstrates knowledge of nutrient requirements throughout the lifespan, and their role in health promotion and disease prevention.

If a CEU certificate is needed, please complete the survey

Moving Forward After Over 40 Years Of Guidance: Innovation And Partnerships To Reduce Sodium Intake

Recorded August 9, 2022

IAFNS is a Continuing Professional Education (CPE) provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR). CDR Credentialed Practitioners will receive 1.0 Continuing Professional Education Unit (CPEU) for completion of this recorded webinar until August 8, 2025.

Description: Sodium is ubiquitous in the food supply and plays multiple important functional roles in food beyond taste, including preservation, safety, shelf life, dough performance, texture and flavor enhancer. The specific combination of roles and levels needed to achieve e.g., safety differ for various foods. Sodium reduction is therefore not a one-size-fits-all-foods approach; new tools, along with technical innovation and food science expertise, will be required to help the food industry achieve the targets for sodium reduction issued in October 2021 by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), while producing products that are satisfactory to consumers. Success will require dedication and partnership across suppliers, the food industry, and regulatory and public health agencies. In this session, an update on FDA efforts to support sodium reduction in foods will be provided. An overview of why and how sodium is used in foods, tools for its reduction, and possible ways to maximize the value of sodium-contributing foods will be covered. Finally, the need for cross-sector partnerships and innovation to achieve new goals will be discussed.

Webinar program:

Naomi Fukagawa, MD PhD, USDA ARS – Moderator
Robin Mckinnon, PhD, MPA, US Food and Drug Administration
Mavra Ahmed, PhD, University of Toronto
Christine Nowakowski, PhD, General Mills

Commission on Dietetic Registration Performance Indicators:

  • 4.1.2 Interprets and integrates evidence-based research and literature in decision-making
  • 6.2.3. Analyzes and interprets data to form valid conclusions and to make recommendations
  • 8.2.1 Engages in educational activities to maintain knowledge and to obtain new knowledge of diseases and clinical conditions

If a CEU certificate is needed, please complete the survey

“Crash Course” On Design And Interpretation Of Gut Microbiome Research

Recorded July 21, 2022

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is an accredited CPE provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR). CDR Credentialed Practitioners will receive 1.0 CPEU for completion of this recorded webinar until May 31, 2024.

Description: Dietitians and other practitioners will be working in the evolving field of gut microbiome science for decades to come. Understanding the fundamentals of research design and interpretation are likely to be core skills. Once research is generated, interpretation and application of findings requires an appreciation for dynamics that extend beyond the food, nutrient, or intervention of interest. Effective application of gut microbiome research requires clinicians to critically appraise methodological elements of research when interpreting results. In this webinar, an overview of best practices for designing and conducting diet-microbiome research in humans will be provided. Topics will include not only intervention study designs but also recruitment tips, sampling methods, important metadata to collect, and more. Attendees will likewise understand important elements to consider when interpreting and applying gut microbiome research.

Webinar program:

Moderator: Mary Lesser, PhD, RD, University of California, Berkeley
Speaker: Sarah Comstock, PhD, Michigan State University
Speaker: Levi Teigen, PhD, RD, University of Minnesota

Q&A and discussion

 

Commission on Dietetic Registration Performance Indicators:

  • 4.1.2 Interprets and integrates evidence-based research and literature in decision-making.
  • 6.2.2 Selects and uses appropriate tools and skills to collect and interpret research data.
  • 8.1.1 Interprets and applies evidence-based literature and standards for determining nutritional needs of target audiences.

If a CEU certificate is needed, please complete the survey

What Is “Sweetness”? The Biological Drive For Sweet Taste And Role In Quality Of Life For Individuals With T1DM

Recorded July 19, 2022

IAFNS is a Continuing Professional Education (CPE) provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR). CDR Credentialed Practitioners will receive 1.0 Continuing Professional Education Unit (CPEU) for completion of this recorded webinar until July 19, 2025.

Description: Several authorities recommend reduction or avoidance of intake of e.g., “sweet flavors”, and suggest that intake of sweet taste in the diet promotes the desire for more sweet, resulting in greater energy intakes. However, the effect of limiting sweet taste on reduction of sugars or energy intake is unknown. In addition, the role of sweetness in the context of sensory perception and the total diet is complex, and the ability to change preference for sweet remains under investigation. Given the biological drive for sweet taste, low- and no- calorie sweeteners (LNCSs) have been acknowledged as a tool for reducing the intake of total carbohydrates, and particularly added sugars, in the nutritional management of diabetes. Although water is the standard of care for individuals with diabetes, LNCSs may help to improve Quality of Life (QoL) when some sweet taste is desired. Reduced QoL can negatively affect diabetes-related outcomes. In this session, the biology of sweet taste and its role in the total diet will be reviewed. In addition, new data from a study assessing the relationship between LNCS use and QoL in adults with Type I Diabetes will be presented.

 

Webinar program:

Ann Coulston, MS RD FADA, Stanford University Medical Center (Retired) – Moderator

Nancy Rawson, PhD MS, Monell Chemical Senses Center

Halis Akturk, MD, Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes

Q&A and discussion

Commission on Dietetic Registration Performance Indicators:

  • 4.1.2 Interprets and integrates evidence-based research and literature in decision-making.
  • 6.2.5 Applies research/evidence-based findings to improve practice, service delivery, and health of customers.
  • 8.1.2 Applies knowledge of food and nutrition as well as the biological, physical, and social sciences in practice.

If a CEU certificate is needed, please complete the survey

IAFNS ACNC: Maternal and Child Diet & Physical Activity

Recorded May 26, 2022

IAFNS is a Continuing Professional Education (CPE) provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR). CDR Credentialed Practitioners will receive 1.0 Continuing Professional Education Units (CPEUs) for completion of this recorded webinar until May 26, 2025.

Description: The session will present the work of Drs. Aline Andres and Taren Swindle, affiliated faculty members at the Arkansas Children’s Nutrition Center, exploring life course determinants of health during several critical periods, including preconception, pregnancy and early childhood. Progress in our understanding of maternal programming of offspring metabolism will be summarized, followed by a review of interventions that may mitigate such effects. In addition, maternal determinants of human milk composition that affect child’s growth and body composition will be explored. After a brief presentation of an implementation science framework, the session will focus on the results of an early childcare intervention intended to improve intake of fruits and vegetables in children aged 3 to 5 y. In closing, a review of other implementation projects aiming at improving physical activity in pregnant women and preschoolers will be provided.

Webinar program:

Prenatal and postnatal programming of health - Dr. Aline Andreas, University of Arkansas ACNC

Implementation Science to improve diet and physical activity in early life - Dr. Taren Swindle, University of Arkansas ACNC

Commission on Dietetic Registration Performance Indicators:

  • 6.2.3 Analyzes and interprets data to form valid conclusions and to make recommendations.
  • 6.4.2 Demonstrates serious inquiry, examination, and experimentation aimed at the discovery and interpretation of knowledge, or the revision of guidelines, theories, policies or laws.
  • 8.1.2 Integrates knowledge of biological, physical, and social sciences with knowledge of food and nutrition to make decisions related to nutrition care.

If a CEU certificate is needed, please complete the survey

IAFNS ACNC: Focus on the Gut and the Brain

Recorded May 23, 2022

IAFNS is a Continuing Professional Education (CPE) provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR). CDR Credentialed Practitioners will receive 1.0 Continuing Professional Education Units (CPEUs) for completion of this recorded webinar until May 23, 2025.

Description: The goal of this webinar is to discuss the effects of the fetal environment and postnatal feeding behaviors on infant gut, immune system and brain health. The speakers will describe data on the role of maternal weight status on brain development, and the impact of chosen feeding regimens on brain and cognitive development and on infant gut and immune system. This will lead to additional information concerning the impact of weight status in children and adolescents on cognitive function and academic achievement. There is increasing interest in the functional interactions between gut and brain development over the lifespan, and the speakers hope to develop this theme over the course of the webinar and to engender discussion on mechanisms to further research in this area.

Webinar program:

The impact of feeding behaviors on cognitive development in children - Dr. Linda Larson-Prior, University of Arkansas ACNC

Diet, activity and body weight status: Impacts on the developing brain - Dr. Xawei Ou, University of Arkansas ACNC

Milk, microbes, and immunity: Lessons from animal models - Dr. Laxmi Yeruva, USDA -ARS, University of Arkansas ACNC

Commission on Dietetic Registration Performance Indicators:

  • 6.2.3 Analyzes and interprets data to form valid conclusions and to make recommendations.
  • 6.4.2 Demonstrates serious inquiry, examination, and experimentation aimed at the discovery and interpretation of knowledge, or the revision of guidelines, theories, policies or laws.
  • 8.1.2 Integrates knowledge of biological, physical, and social sciences with knowledge of food and nutrition to make decisions related to nutrition care.

If a CEU certificate is needed, please complete the survey

IAFNS ACNC: Early Life Determinants of Metabolic Health Impact of Fitness and Physical

Recorded May 17, 2022

IAFNS is a Continuing Professional Education (CPE) provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR). CDR Credentialed Practitioners will receive 1.0 Continuing Professional Education Units (CPEUs) for completion of this recorded webinar until May 17, 2025.

Description: Maternal obesity predisposes offspring to excessive weight gain in early life. Pediatric obesity impacts normal growth and development and increases cardiometabolic disease susceptibility across the lifespan. In adults, physical fitness is a strong predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause morbidity and mortality. However, the role of early life physical activity and fitness in modifying cardiometabolic health trajectories, and whether the impact of exercise/physical activity interventions vary across different periods of development, are poorly understood. Further, it is unclear how trainable physical fitness is in offspring from parents with obesity and/or low physical fitness. At Arkansas Children’s Nutrition Center, these questions are studied in the Laboratory for Active Kids and Families and in preclinical novel models.

Webinar program:

ACNC Overview - Dr. Mario Ferruzzi, University of Arkansas ACNC

Obesity, fitness and cardiometabolic health in children - Dr. Elisabet Børsheim, University of Arkansas ACNC

Development and optimization of rodent models to study metabolic health across the lifespan - Dr. Craig Porter, University of Arkansas ACNC

Commission on Dietetic Registration Performance Indicators:

  • 6.2.3 Analyzes and interprets data to form valid conclusions and to make recommendations.
  • 6.4.2 Demonstrates serious inquiry, examination, and experimentation aimed at the discovery and interpretation of knowledge, or the revision of guidelines, theories, policies or laws.
  • 8.1.2 Integrates knowledge of biological, physical, and social sciences with knowledge of food and nutrition to make decisions related to nutrition care.

If a CEU certificate is needed, please complete the survey