Evidence Map on the Relationship Between Exposure to Dietary Sweetness and Body Weight-Related Outcomes in Adults

Dietary recommendations from numerous governmental and health organizations recommend reduced intake of added sugars due to the health risks, including the risk of overweight and obesity. Some recommendations include avoiding dietary sweetness – regardless of the source – based on the hypothesis that reduced exposure to dietary sweetness will reduce the preference and desire for sweet foods/beverages.  Given the limited or lack of association between dietary sweetness and food choice, it is unclear whether reducing dietary sweetness would result in beneficial changes in body composition. Before a conclusion on the association between dietary sweetness and body weight can be determined, it is necessary to determine the availability of evidence in the published literature. This evidence map will be conducted to characterize the evidence on the association between dietary sweetness and body weight-related outcomes. The objective of this work is to determine whether there is sufficient evidence to conduct a systematic evidence review and identify future research priorities.

Institution: USDA Agricultural Research Service

Principal Investigators: Kelly Higgins, PhD; David Baer, PhD

Amount of Award: $8K (Dr. Katherine Appleton, Bournemouth University); other costs covered by USDA’s congressional appropriation

Year Awarded: 2021

View this project on the Center for Open Science’s Open Science Framework here.

This work is supported by the IAFNS Low- and No-Calorie Sweeteners Committee and Carbohydrates Committee.

Assessing the Relationship between Low-Calorie Sweetener Use and Quality of Life Measures in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

Low- and No- calorie sweeteners (LNCSs) have been acknowledged as a tool for reducing the intake of total carbohydrates and particularly added sugars in the nutritional management of diabetes. LNCSs may also help to improve Quality of Life (QoL). QoL is an important aspect in management of diabetes as reduced QoL can negatively affect diabetes-related outcomes. As such, understanding the potential relationship between use of LNCSs to replace added sugars and excess carbohydrate in the diet on QoL is important. This knowledge may also be useful to clinicians who field questions about the general utility of LNCSs. A recent systematic review sponsored by the World Health Organization that was designed to investigate the effects of LCS use for people with diabetes included health-related QoL as an outcome measure. However, authors did not identify any data in the peer-reviewed literature that met the inclusion-exclusion criteria specified. Authors concluded that data on this “patient-important outcome” were “scarce or lacking”. The objective of this work is to assess the relationship between use of LCSs and health-related Quality of Life (QoL) measures in individuals residing in North America that were diagnosed with diabetes (type 1) not less than 1 year ago.

Institution: University of Colorado

Principal Investigator: Halis K. Akturk, MD

Amount of Award: $45,000

Year Awarded: 2021

View this project on the Center for Open Science’s Open Science Framework here.

This work is supported by the IAFNS Low- and No-Calorie Sweeteners Committee

Perspective: Measuring Sweetness in Foods, Beverages, and Diets: Toward Understanding the Role of Sweetness in Health

Understanding Sweetness: Perception, Liking, and the Role of Sweet Taste in a Healthy Eating Plan

Recorded December 2, 2020.

Continuing Education Hours: IAFNS is a Continuing Professional Education (CPE) provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR). CDR Credentialed Practitioners will receive 1.0 Continuing Professional Education Unit (CPEU) for completion of this recorded webinar.

Description:

As a means of addressing excess intakes of added sugars and the link to obesity, authoritative guidance (e.g., from the Pan America Health Organization, Health Canada, and others) includes avoidance of sweet taste in a dietary pattern. Statements about avoidance of sweet include use of low-calorie sweeteners, a tool shown to be useful in reducing added sugars intake. There is an opportunity to communicate what is known about how individuals perceive sweet, alterations due to changes in physiology, and implications for health. Reconciling current messages about sweet taste given individual variability and the role of sweet in a healthy eating plan will be covered. Finally, speakers will review some of the research gaps toward better understanding the role of sweetness to support optimal public health messaging and nutrition counseling.

Webinar program:

Moderator: Marie Latulippe, MS, RDN, IAFNS

Individual Differences in Sweet Taste: Implications for Nutrition Practitioners

  • Beverly J Tepper, PhD, Head of the Sensory Evaluation Laboratory Director of the Center for Sensory Sciences & Innovation Department of Food Science, Rutgers University

Crafting Public Health Messages Around Sweet Taste: The Struggle is Real

  • Robin M. Tucker, PhD, RD, Assistant Professor of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University

Learning outcomes:

After this presentation, the viewer will be able to:

  • Articulate the rationale for differences in patient and client responses to sweetness.

  • Provide evidence-based responses to client questions about sweetness in the diet and management of gestational diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and weight.

  • Counsel clients and patients on where and how to identify sweetness in the diet and the role of sweetness in an eating plan that promotes health.

Continuing Education Hours: IAFNS is a Continuing Professional Education (CPE) provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR). CDR Credentialed Practitioners will receive 1.0 Continuing Professional Education Unit (CPEU) for completion of this recorded webinar until December 2, 2023.

If a CEU certificate is needed, please complete the survey

Click here to load this Caspio Cloud Database

 

Repeated Exposure to and Subsequent Consumption of Sweet Taste: Reanalysis of Test Meal Intake Data Following the Repeated Consumption of Sweet vs Non-sweet Beverages

Understanding Sweetness: Perception, Liking and the Role of Sweet Taste in a Healthy Eating Plan

Impact of Dietary Sweetness Exposure on Future Dietary Intake: Reanalysis of Existing Intervention Trial Data

Several global health authorities recommend avoidance of sweetness in the diet from both sugar and low-calorie or non-nutritive sweeteners, due to concerns that intake of sweet taste drives a preference for more sweetness, with ultimate negative consequences for energy intake and weight. However, the scientific data available to understand the role of sweetness in the diet is severely lacking. The aim of this project is to re-harvest existing clinical trial data in a way that provides information about selection and intake of sweet vs. non-sweet foods after some intervention.

Institution: Bournemouth University
Principal Investigator: Katherine Appleton, PhD, RD
Amount Awarded: $2,000
Year Awarded: 2020

Read more.

View this project on the Center for Open Science’s Open Science Framework.

Learn more about the IAFNS Low-Calorie Sweeteners Committee.

Effect of Low-Calorie Sweetener Intake on Glycemic Response

Globally, dietary guidance recommends reducing added and total sugars in the diet to reduce caloric intake and chronic disease. Low-calorie sweeteners (LCS) present an option for reducing calories while providing sweetness in the diet, but questions remain regarding the effects of LCS on health, including its effects on glycemic response and diabetes. This project will systematically review randomized controlled trials to determine the relationship between LCS and glycemic response in adults.

Institution: Glycemia Consulting Inc.
Principal Investigator: 
John Sievenpiper, BASc, MD, MSc, PhD, FRCPC (University of Toronto)
Amount Awarded: 
$90,000
Year Awarded:
2020

View this project on the Center for Open Science’s Open Science Framework.

Learn more about the IAFNS Low-Calorie Sweeteners Committee.