The Committee on Food and Chemical Safety promotes a science-based determination of the chemical safety of foods to support the advancement of public health.

How this committee operates:

The Food and Chemical Safety committee focuses on many different issues related to the safety of the food supply.  In order to maximize output, the committee is segmented into  subcommittees, each focusing on a specific area of food and chemical safety.  Explore those subcommittees and the impact of their work below. 

Areas of Work

Food Allergens

In 2016 the National Academies of Sciences recommended that the food industry, FDA and USDA work to replace the Precautionary Allergen Labeling system for low-level contaminants with a new risk-based labeling approach. This recommendation formed the basis for this project on eliciting doses for peanut protein in allergic individuals. This work, led by scientists at University of Cincinnati, presents the first analysis of US clinical data to determine the relationship between the dose of peanut protein and allergic response in sensitive individuals (expected publication in late February 2021)

The committee was a co-sponsor of the Health and Medicine Division (HMD) Committee on Food Allergies which comes with responsibility for the work of this Committee.  The report, Finding a Path to Safety in Food Allergy was made available in 2017.

Next Generation Risk Assessment
Mycotoxins
Heavy Metals
Process Formed Compounds
FDA Redbook

COMMITTEE MEMBERS
Abbott Nutrition
Cargill, Incorporated
Campbell Soup
Conagra Brands
General Mills, Inc.
The Hershey Company
Keurig Dr Pepper​
Kraft Heinz Company
McCormick
Mondelēz International

ACADEMIC ADVISOR
Norbert Kaminski, PhD, Michigan State University

GOVERNMENT ADVISORS
Randolph Duverna, PhD, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety & Inspection Service Office of Public Health Service

Suzanne Fitzpatrick, PhD, DABT, United States Food and Drug Administration
Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition

Louis D'Amico, PhD,
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Office of Research and Development

Toxicology Summer Fellow

The IAFNS Summer Fellowship allows motivated graduate students to pursue research projects under the guidance of IAFNS staff and members of the Food and Chemical Safety Committee. View past Summer Fellowship projects below.

Past Publications

All Publications

Bayesian Hierarchical Evaluation of Dose-Response for Peanut Allergy in Clinical Trial Screening

Risk-based labeling based on the minimal eliciting doses in populations with peanut allergy is a potentially more informative alternative to current labeling practices for those challenged with managing food allergens. This study focuses on the eliciting doses for 1 and 5 percent of sensitive individuals.

Read more about Bayesian Hierarchical Evaluation of Dose-Response for Peanut Allergy in Clinical Trial Screening

Global Wheat Trade and Codex Alimentarius Guidelines for Deoxynivalenol: A Mycotoxin Common in Wheat

2015 Codex guidelines for a mycotoxin do not appear to be affecting the global wheat trade. Without a core-periphery structure and engaged nations in the center of world wheat trade adopting these guidelines, it may take longer for these guidelines to be widely adopted, and for populations worldwide to benefit from lower exposure to Deoxynivalenol in their diets.

Read more about Global Wheat Trade and Codex Alimentarius Guidelines for Deoxynivalenol: A Mycotoxin Common in Wheat

State of the Science on Alternatives to Animal Testing and Integration of Testing Strategies for Food Safety Assessments: Workshop Proceedings

These proceedings highlight advances in testing strategies to reduce animal testing and the need for the development of a standardized approach for use of these alternative methodologies in food safety assessment.

Read more about State of the Science on Alternatives to Animal Testing and Integration of Testing Strategies for Food Safety Assessments: Workshop Proceedings

Incorporating New Approach Methodologies in Toxicity Testing and Exposure Assessment for Tiered Risk Assessment Using the RISK21 Approach: Case Studies on Food Contact Chemicals

This study highlights the potential utility of the RISK21 approach for interpretation of the ToxCast HTS data, as well as the challenges involved in integrating in vitro HTS data into safety assessments. This work was supported by the IAFNS Food and Chemical Safety Committee 2016 Summer Fellowship.

Read more about Incorporating New Approach Methodologies in Toxicity Testing and Exposure Assessment for Tiered Risk Assessment Using the RISK21 Approach: Case Studies on Food Contact Chemicals

Evaluating the Applicability of a Risk-based Approach (Decision Tree) to Mycotoxins Mitigation

The primary aim of this work was to evaluate a hypothesis on whether a foundational framework (decision tree) previously developed by the North American Branch of the International Life Sciences Institute (IAFNS) Food and Chemical Safety Committee for a risk-based approach to mitigation of process-formed compounds could be applied to other not-readily-avoidable substances, such as mycotoxins.

Read more about Evaluating the Applicability of a Risk-based Approach (Decision Tree) to Mycotoxins Mitigation

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Past Events

Past Events

IAFP 2021

Phoenix, Arizona, USA

Each year, the International Association for Food Protection hosts an Annual Meeting, providing attendees with information on current and emerging food safety issues, the latest science, innovative solutions to new and recurring problems, and the opportunity to network with thousands of food safety professionals from around the globe.

Read more about IAFP 2021

IAFP 2020 Annual Meeting

Virtual, USA

Each year, the International Association for Food Protection hosts an Annual Meeting, providing attendees with information on current and emerging food safety issues, the latest science, innovative solutions to new and recurring problems, and the opportunity to network with thousands of food safety professionals from around the globe. IAFNS is supporting four sessions at the 2020 IAFP Annual Meeting.

Read more about IAFP 2020 Annual Meeting

IAFNS Virtual Symposium on Risk Assessment of PFAS in Food

Virtual, Symposium

IAFNS is pleased to announce the second session in the symposium “Identifying Science Gaps for Risk Assessment of Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) in Food”. This session will address risk characterization with a focus on exposure routes and toxicology, and will build on the first session on PFAS Analytical Methodology which was held June 23rd.

Read more about IAFNS Virtual Symposium on Risk Assessment of PFAS in Food

IAFNS 2019 Food Packaging Conference: Scientific Advances and Challenges in Safety Evaluation of Food Packaging Materials

Washington, DC, USA

IAFNS is hosting the 2019 Food Packaging Conference: Scientific Advances and Challenges in Safety Evaluation of Food Packaging Materials on April 2nd-3rd, 2019. The global two-day conference will bring together international and national experts from academia, government, industry and NGOs to share about toxicology, risk assessment and regulatory science as they relate to food packaging.

Read more about IAFNS 2019 Food Packaging Conference: Scientific Advances and Challenges in Safety Evaluation of Food Packaging Materials

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Each year, the International Association for Food Protection hosts an Annual Meeting, providing attendees with information on current and emerging food safety issues, the latest science, innovative solutions to new and recurring problems, and the opportunity to network with thousands of food safety professionals from around the globe.

This year, IAFNS Food and Chemical Safety Committee and Food Microbiology Committee are supporting the four sessions at the IAFP Annual Meeting.

Progressing Allergen Risk Management: Thresholds and Quantitative Risk Assessment Expand

July 21, 2021, 1:45 PM - 3:15 PM ET

Food allergies constitute a significant public health issue that affects approximately 32 million Americans. The Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE) reports a 377% increase in the diagnosis of anaphylactic food reactions between 2007 and 2016. Although research is ongoing for therapeutics, the primary management for food-allergic consumers is strict dietary avoidance. Food choices, however, may be limited for these consumers because of widespread and inconsistent use of precautionary allergen labeling (e.g., statements such as may contain). The concept of reference doses based on a threshold effect is routinely used in public health risk assessment to inform the approach to risk management. For food allergens, dose response modeling of clinical data from oral food challenges in food-allergic individuals has the potential to inform allergen risk management decisions and drive consistency in allergen labeling. This session will explore the current understanding and application of reference doses for food allergens (derived from the modeling of individual thresholds) and consider what information and tools are needed to progress toward reliable allergen risk assessment and management decisions.

Bayesian Hierarchical Evaluation of Dose-Response for Peanut Allergy in Clinical Trial Screening
Lynne Haber, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH Occurrence of Allergens in Pre-Packaged Foods in Conjunction with the Use of Precautionary Labeling in Canada: Learnings and Future Directions
Samuel Godefroy, Université Laval, Department of Food Science, Faculty of Agriculture and Food Sciences, Quebec City, QC, Canada Practical Applications of Quantitative Risk Assessment of Allergens
Benjamin Remington, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE

 

This session is supported by the IAFNS Food and Chemical Safety Committee.

Developing Atmospheric Cold Plasma as a Nonthermal Food Safety Tool Expand

July 21, 2021, 4:30 PM - 6:30 PM ET

Cold plasma is an emerging technology proposed as a nonthermal process to reduce food safety risks on a variety of foods. Atmospheric cold plasma has a benefit in that it can be applied to packaged foods to reduce surface contaminants such as Salmonella or STEC on fresh fruits and vegetables or L. monocytogenes on high-moisture cheeses. This symposium will present an overview of the technology, examples of inactivating microbes as well as demonstrating it as a novel approach to reduce the presence of mycotoxins on grains. Results from validation studies will be presented and challenges to commercialization will be addressed.

Brendan Niemira, PhD, USDA Agricultural Research Service

 

Kevin Keener, PhD, University of Guelph

 

Melha Mellata, PhD, Iowa State University

 

Paula Bourke, PhD, University College Dublin

 

 

This event is supported by the IAFNS Food Microbiology Committee.

Advances in Powdered Food Safety and Quality Sampling Plans: Theory, Simulation and Practice Expand

July 19, 2021, 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM ET

Powdered products are burdened by low-prevalence, low-level contamination that is typically heterogeneously distributed. Multiple commodities and products could benefit from improved management of these risks as evidenced by outbreaks of foodborne disease linked to dairy powders, wheat and nut flours, and powdered infant formula. This session will focus on advances in powder sampling and provide depth in one well-studied commodity, dairy powder, upon which other commodities may draw analogous lessons.

As manufacturers supply domestic and global markets, they must continue to manage rare microbiological contamination with foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella, chemical contamination with mycotoxins such as aflatoxin, and meet increasingly stringent customer quality requirements for indicator and spore counts, to ensure product compliance with regulatory standards. While product testing is one fundamental component of food safety and quality management, traditional best practices like ICMSF-style manual N60 grab sampling is underpowered when those hazards are at low prevalence and level. Modern technologies like autosamplers provide opportunities to improve practice by automating the process of sample collection. This opens the possibility to take many more, smaller samples with complex stratification and true randomness.

Currently, the food industry is needing improvements in practices to meet safety and quality challenges. This session meets that need by addressing knowledge gaps around the benefits of improved sampling plans, technologies and implementation strategies, using dairy powders as an example case. The session will start with a speaker presenting recent statistical theory modelling powder sampling to define the performance of traditional grab compared to auto sampling approaches. The next speaker will present work simulating dairy powder sampling to better define the variability of sampling plans when applied to specific production and hazard scenarios. Finally, we will hear from an industry speaker providing perspective on the value and practicality of getting this done in a multinational company.

Modelling the Effect of Sampling Methods on Detection Tests for Powdered Products
Roger Kissling, Fonterra Simulating Production and Hazard Scenarios in Powdered Product Sampling to Improve Food Safety Sampling Plans
Matthew J. Stasiewicz, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Industry Need and Role for Improved Sampling of Powdered Products
Pamela Wilger, Cargill

 

This session is supported by the IAFNS Food Microbiology Committee.

 

 

 

Emergency Use of Microbial Methods of Detection by Industry - Alternative Routes Proving Fit for Purpose Expand

July 20, 2021, 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM ET

The food safety industry must ensure analytical methods designed to detect hazards are fit-for-purpose for their specific commodities. Meanwhile, the food industry is developing hundreds of new ingredients and products that will require screening for microbial hazards. With the ever-expanding diversity of these food products, what happens when a testing laboratory is presented with an urgent request for testing a matrix that was not included in the method's original validation study? The laboratory is asked to deviate from the intended use of the method by testing a different matrix or a different test portion size.

This situation can occur when a food manufacturer requires a faster turn-around time for product release than their standard method allows, when there is a sudden issue with the performance of a rapid test kit, or if a test kits from the manufacturer are backordered. Do these situations constitute an emergency? Arguably, this upset in product distribution could constitute an emergency in terms of the supply chain which is already under stress due to pandemic disruptions - with real effects on consumer well-being and the economy.

This roundtable will consider the key components required for a matrix validation and acceptable strategies for matrix validation that can be used in emergency situations. What approaches will allow expediency while assuring that the method is fit for purpose?

Invited panel participants:
• Deann Akins-Lewenthal, ConAgra Brands
• Patrick Bird, Technical Consultant, AOAC INTERNATIONAL
• Megan Brown, Eurofins
• Tom Hammack, US Food and Drug Administration
• Kelly Stevens, General Mills

 

This session is supported by the IAFNS Food Microbiology Committee.

 

 

Learn more about the IAFP Annual Meeting.

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Each year, the International Association for Food Protection hosts an Annual Meeting, providing attendees with information on current and emerging food safety issues, the latest science, innovative solutions to new and recurring problems, and the opportunity to network with thousands of food safety professionals from around the globe.

IAFNS is supporting three sessions, a roundtable event and three posters at the 2019 IAFP Annual Meeting.

Scientific Sessions:

Managing Large Multidisciplinary/Multi-Institutional Food Safety Projects - Effectively, Impactfully, and with Integrity Expand

Monday, July 22, 2019 | 1:30 - 5:15 PM | Ballroom D

Food safety is a complex and multidisciplinary challenge. Therefore, federally-funded food safety projects, and even industry-centered projects, increasingly involve large, multidisciplinary/multiinstitutional collaborative teams. However, very few individuals thrust into these roles have formal education or training in managing such projects. This symposium brings together a unique and diverse cohort of presenters, ranging from an expert on assessing the effectiveness and impact of research collaborations and centers (with experience on multiple food safety project teams) to experienced managers of such projects (in government, academic, and industry) to a representative of the Scientific Integrity Consortium. The speakers will describe measures for evaluating the effectiveness of such largescale collaborations, identify common features of successful collaborations, share best practices for forming and managing such teams, and outline essential foundational principles for ensuring the quality and integrity of the resulting research. A panel discussion is included to maximize opportunities for attendee interaction with the multiple perspectives provided by the speakers. After this session, attendees will have a better appreciation on how to play together well in the research sandbox.

Conveners: Bradley Marks, Michigan State University; Kendra Nightingale, Texas Tech University; and Isabel Walls, USDA NIFA

Scholarly Assessment of Large Scholarly Collaboration: Measures of Effectiveness and Impact
Denis Gray, PhD, North Carolina State University Managing Government-Academic-Industry Collaborations
Kimberly Cook, PhD, USDA ARS Lessons Learned from Managing NoroCORE, a Large USDA-CAP Project
Lee-Ann Jaykus, PhD, North Carolina State University Managing Food Safety Projects Across Multiple Boundaries - Internally and Externally
Edith Wilkin, PhD, Leprino Foods Report from the Scientific Integrity Consortium: Principles and Best Practices for Scientific Integrity
Linda Harris, PhD, University of California, Davis

This session is supported by the IAFNS Food Microbiology Commitee.

The Mitigation and Regulation of Heat-Formed Substances Produced in Foods During Cooking: What are the Unintended Consequences on Microbial Safety and Public Health? Expand

Tuesday, July 23, 2019 | 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM | M107

A growing field in food safety is the focus on the potential risk of heat-formed substances produced during cooking. Compounds that are known as human health hazards are being increasingly identified as heat-formed substances present in food. Two prominent examples of this are acrylamide and furfuryl alcohol, both of which are present in significant amounts in a wide array of foods. This session will help inform how the risk assessment process of heat-formed substances can incorporate the benefits of cooking and cooked food. It will highlight the genetic changes that allowed humans to consume cooked food. The session will then explore the unintended consequences in mitigating heat formed substances, such as introducing microbial hazards. It will address how to assess and communicate these risks to food processors and consumers. The potential impact and implications on the food industry and, ultimately, the end consumer, of using current approaches to assess the potential public health impact of compounds formed during routine cooking of food will be debated.

Convener: Steven Hermansky, PharmD, PhD, DABT, ConAgra Brands

Genetic Evidence of Human Adaptation to a Cooked Diet and its Role in Human Health and Food Safety - Video not available
Steven Hermansky, PharmD, PhD, DABT, ConAgra Brands Balancing Microbial Food Safety Risks with Mitigating Heat-Formed Substances in Foods - Video not available
Scott Hood, PhD, General Mills The Need for a Holistic Toxicological Assessment of Heat-formed Substances within A Food Matrix -Video
Michael Dourson, PhD, DABT, FATS, FSRA, Toxicology Excellence for Risk Assessment

This session is supported by the IAFNS Food and Chemical Safety Committee.

Let's Hear from Next Generation Food Safety Scientists on Pathogen Behavior in Ready to Eat Foods Expand

Wednesday, July 24, 2019 | 1:30 - 3:30 PM | Ballroom E

A current research collaboration between Health Canada, the University of Guelph and North Carolina State University is investigating the survival and inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, and foodborne viruses during the storage of low moisture foods. This is a wide-ranging research consortium funded by the IAFNS Food Microbiology Committee and includes a number of developing research scientists who will also present their findings. The IAFNS Food Microbiology Committee is committed to proactively improving the understanding and control of microbial food safety hazards to enable scientifically informed decision making. The Committee achieves its mission by funding research that is conducted at institutions who also train the next generation of food safety scientists.

Ready-to-eat low moisture products such as nuts, dried fruits, cereal products, and chocolate are often ingredients used in the manufacturing of many food products. They carry significant potential for the amplification of outbreaks and recalls over a wide variety of products. The research consortium represented by this next generation of food safety experts is studying several aspects of pathogen behavior in low moisture ready-to-eat foods and goes beyond traditional thermal mitigation strategies.

Conveners: Laurie Post, PhD, Deibel Labs; Edith Wilkin, PhD, Leprino Foods

Survival, Inactivation and Detection of Foodborne Viruses During Long Term Storage in Chocolate, Pistachios and Cornflakes
Neda Nasheri, PhD, Health Canada Survival and Virulence of L. monocytogenes During Storage on Low Moisture Foods and Characterization of the Low Moisture Foods Microbiome
Vivian Ly, MSc candidate, University of Guelph Nontraditional Decontamination Methods for Salmonella Reduction in Dried Fruits and Cereals
Kayla Murray, PhD candidate, University of Guelph Identification of Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Long-Term Survival of Salmonella in Pistachios, Dried Apples, and Cornflakes
Victor Oladimeji Jayeola, PhD candidate, North Carolina State University

This session is supported by the IAFNS Food Microbiology Committee.

Roundtable Event:

Is It Time for Food Safety Performance Standards Since Zero Risk Is Not an Option? Expand

Monday, July 22, 2019 | 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM | Ballroom E

Food safety systems rely on verification activities to determine if the system is working as designed and validated. Microbiological performance standards can be used to verify if a processing system is adequately controlling a specific hazard. Performance standards should be set to protect public health. Sampling protocols and microbiological testing methods must be appropriate for the food being tested. In the US poultry industry, performance standards have been in place to measure the prevalence of Salmonella. Over time, the performance standards have changed to reflect the improved conditions in the industry. Prevalence based performance standards may work for other product categories, especially in dry products of raw agricultural products such as wheat flours and the produce area especially for frozen fruits and vegetables. This roundtable discussion will explore the current and potential future uses of performance standards in foods where it is not reasonable to expect zero presence of pathogens.

Convener: Christina Stam, PhD, Kraft Heinz

Panelists:
Craig Hedberg, PhD, University of Minnesota
Candace Doepker, PhD, ToxStrategies
Angie Siemens, PhD, Cargill
Scott Hood, PhD, General Mills
Donna Garren, PhD, American Frozen Food Institute

This roundtable event is supported by the IAFNS Food Microbiology Committee.

Poster Presentations:

A Novel Simulation Approach to Improving the Effectiveness of Sampling for Bulk Food Products - Video
Eric Cheng, University of Illinois | P1-124 | Monday, July 22, 8:30am - 6:15pm Global Gene Expression Analysis of Salmonella Contaminating Low-Moisture Foods - Video
Victor Oladimeji Jayeola, North Carolina State University | P1-201 | Monday, July 22, 8:30am - 6:15pm Prevalence and Characteristics of Selected Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens in Post-Hurricane Florence Floodwaters - Video
Jeff Niedermeyer, North Carolina State University | P3-161 | Wednesday, July 24, 8:30am - 3:30pm

Learn more about the IAFP Annual Meeting here.

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IAFNS is hosting the 2019 Food Packaging Conference: Scientific Advances and Challenges in Safety Evaluation of Food Packaging Materials at The Westin Washington, D.C. City Center on April 2nd-3rd, 2019. The global two-day conference will bring together international and national experts from academia, government, industry and NGOs to share about toxicology, risk assessment and regulatory science as they relate to food packaging.

View presentation videos from this event.

Day 1

Day 2

Speaker Abstracts Registration

Register by the Early Bird Deadline and save!

Regular & On-Site:
 16 Mar 2019 - 3 Apr 2019
Industry/For-Profit $600 $700
Government/Academia/Non-Profit* FREE $300
Student/Post Doc* FREE $300
Breakfast (2), lunch (2) and a reception are included with registration.
*Capacity is limited. Register early! Hotel Accommodations
We have secured a room block at The Westin Washington, DC City Center, the venue for the 2019 Food Packaging Conference, with a nightly rate of $279, exclusive of state and local taxes. The room block ends 11 March 2019 but we recommend that you make your reservation in advance as space fills quickly. After you have successfully registered for your room you will receive an email confirmation. Please click here to reserve your room. Hotel Address:
The Westin Washington, D.C. City Center
1400 M St. NW
Washington, DC 20005 Travel Air Travel:
Washington, DC is located near three major airports: Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA), Dulles International Airport (IAD), and Baltimore/Washington International Airport (BWI). Reagan National Airport is located closest to DC and is accessible via its own Metro stop on the Blue and Yellow lines. If commuting to The Westin via Metro from DCA, hop on the blue line at the Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport Metro Stop and get off at McPherson Square (7 stops). You can also take a taxi, Uber or Lyft into DC. This will cost around $15-$25.

Dulles Airport is located 26 miles outside of DC in Virginia. To get downtown you can take a taxi, shuttle, Uber or Lyft. A taxi to DC will cost around $60-$70. BWI is the furthest but may offer better flight deals. All three airports offer domestic and international flights daily.

Metro:
Metro is the most convenient way to get around DC. This public transportation system consists of six color-coded lines: Red, Blue, Orange, Silver, Green, and Yellow that are connected to each other via transfer stations. To ride Metro you must pay via a SmarTrip card which can be purchased at any Metro station with cash or credit. Most fares range from $2.25 - $6 per trip. Metro runs from 5 a.m. to midnight on weekdays and from 7 a.m. to midnight on weekends. The closest Metro stop to the conference venue is McPherson Square, accessible via the orange, silver, and blue lines. Click here for more information about Metro. Taxi:
Another way to travel in DC is by taxi. There are many and all accept cash, credit and debit cards. Uber/Lyft:
To travel by uber or Lyft, download the app onto your smartphone and you can begin requesting a ride by entering the address of your destination. DC Circulator:
The DC Circulator travels along six specific routes and is affordable at just $1 per ride. International

When traveling to the 2019 Food Packaging Conference, the U.S. may require visitors to obtain a visa. This process can take a few weeks to several months to complete, so please be sure to apply early. For more information about your country's visa requirements, visit the U.S. State Department website for the latest information when planning your trip.

IAFNS can provide a formal invitation letter to assist with the visa submission process. Please contact Angela Roberts (angelar@iafnsconnect.wpengine.com) to request a letter.

Contact Us:

Discover DC:

Plan your trip Plan your trip Cherry Blossoms

Depending on the weather, the beginning of April is usually around the time cherry blossom trees reach peak bloom in DC. Check out the beautiful pink and white sights on the Tidal Basin.

If you're taking the Metro, use the Blue, Orange or Silver lines and exit at the Smithsonian stop. From there, it's a 10-15 minute walk to the Tidal Basin Welcome Area located at 1501 Maine Avenue SW. If you are taking the Metrobus, the 32, 34 or 36 routes will drop you off at the National Mall.

Free Attractions

There are plenty of free attractions in Washington, DC:

National Museum of American History
Korean War Veterans Memorial
National Museum of the American Indian
Vietnam Veterans Memorial
Anderson House
Arlington National Cemetery
National World War II Memorial
Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
National Air and Space Museum
Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
National Gallery of Art Downtown DC

Check out our top picks:

White House
National Mall and Memorial Parks
United States Capitol
Ford's Theatre
United States Botanic Garden Beyond the National Mall

Check out these 20 cool museums beyond the National Mall.

Restaurants

There are plenty of restaurants within walking distance of the hotel:

0.1 miles from hotel:
Lincoln
West Wing Café Thomas Circle
10 Thomas Restaurant
Stans Restaurant and Lounge 0.2 miles from hotel:
Quill
The Pig
Baan Thai
B Too
&pizza
Churchkey
Birch and Barley
Elizabeth's Gone Raw
Siren

 

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Each year, the International Association for Food Protection hosts an Annual Meeting, providing attendees with information on current and emerging food safety issues, the latest science, innovative solutions to new and recurring problems, and the opportunity to network with thousands of food safety professionals from around the globe.

This year, IAFNS Food and Chemical Safety Committee and Food Microbiology Committee are supporting the four sessions at the IAFP Annual Meeting.

Progressing Allergen Risk Management: Thresholds and Quantitative Risk Assessment Expand

July 21, 2021, 1:45 PM - 3:15 PM ET

Food allergies constitute a significant public health issue that affects approximately 32 million Americans. The Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE) reports a 377% increase in the diagnosis of anaphylactic food reactions between 2007 and 2016. Although research is ongoing for therapeutics, the primary management for food-allergic consumers is strict dietary avoidance. Food choices, however, may be limited for these consumers because of widespread and inconsistent use of precautionary allergen labeling (e.g., statements such as may contain). The concept of reference doses based on a threshold effect is routinely used in public health risk assessment to inform the approach to risk management. For food allergens, dose response modeling of clinical data from oral food challenges in food-allergic individuals has the potential to inform allergen risk management decisions and drive consistency in allergen labeling. This session will explore the current understanding and application of reference doses for food allergens (derived from the modeling of individual thresholds) and consider what information and tools are needed to progress toward reliable allergen risk assessment and management decisions.

Bayesian Hierarchical Evaluation of Dose-Response for Peanut Allergy in Clinical Trial Screening
Lynne Haber, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH Occurrence of Allergens in Pre-Packaged Foods in Conjunction with the Use of Precautionary Labeling in Canada: Learnings and Future Directions
Samuel Godefroy, Université Laval, Department of Food Science, Faculty of Agriculture and Food Sciences, Quebec City, QC, Canada Practical Applications of Quantitative Risk Assessment of Allergens
Benjamin Remington, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE

 

This session is supported by the IAFNS Food and Chemical Safety Committee.

Developing Atmospheric Cold Plasma as a Nonthermal Food Safety Tool Expand

July 21, 2021, 4:30 PM - 6:30 PM ET

Cold plasma is an emerging technology proposed as a nonthermal process to reduce food safety risks on a variety of foods. Atmospheric cold plasma has a benefit in that it can be applied to packaged foods to reduce surface contaminants such as Salmonella or STEC on fresh fruits and vegetables or L. monocytogenes on high-moisture cheeses. This symposium will present an overview of the technology, examples of inactivating microbes as well as demonstrating it as a novel approach to reduce the presence of mycotoxins on grains. Results from validation studies will be presented and challenges to commercialization will be addressed.

Brendan Niemira, PhD, USDA Agricultural Research Service

 

Kevin Keener, PhD, University of Guelph

 

Melha Mellata, PhD, Iowa State University

 

Paula Bourke, PhD, University College Dublin

 

 

This event is supported by the IAFNS Food Microbiology Committee.

Advances in Powdered Food Safety and Quality Sampling Plans: Theory, Simulation and Practice Expand

July 19, 2021, 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM ET

Powdered products are burdened by low-prevalence, low-level contamination that is typically heterogeneously distributed. Multiple commodities and products could benefit from improved management of these risks as evidenced by outbreaks of foodborne disease linked to dairy powders, wheat and nut flours, and powdered infant formula. This session will focus on advances in powder sampling and provide depth in one well-studied commodity, dairy powder, upon which other commodities may draw analogous lessons.

As manufacturers supply domestic and global markets, they must continue to manage rare microbiological contamination with foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella, chemical contamination with mycotoxins such as aflatoxin, and meet increasingly stringent customer quality requirements for indicator and spore counts, to ensure product compliance with regulatory standards. While product testing is one fundamental component of food safety and quality management, traditional best practices like ICMSF-style manual N60 grab sampling is underpowered when those hazards are at low prevalence and level. Modern technologies like autosamplers provide opportunities to improve practice by automating the process of sample collection. This opens the possibility to take many more, smaller samples with complex stratification and true randomness.

Currently, the food industry is needing improvements in practices to meet safety and quality challenges. This session meets that need by addressing knowledge gaps around the benefits of improved sampling plans, technologies and implementation strategies, using dairy powders as an example case. The session will start with a speaker presenting recent statistical theory modelling powder sampling to define the performance of traditional grab compared to auto sampling approaches. The next speaker will present work simulating dairy powder sampling to better define the variability of sampling plans when applied to specific production and hazard scenarios. Finally, we will hear from an industry speaker providing perspective on the value and practicality of getting this done in a multinational company.

Modelling the Effect of Sampling Methods on Detection Tests for Powdered Products
Roger Kissling, Fonterra Simulating Production and Hazard Scenarios in Powdered Product Sampling to Improve Food Safety Sampling Plans
Matthew J. Stasiewicz, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Industry Need and Role for Improved Sampling of Powdered Products
Pamela Wilger, Cargill

 

This session is supported by the IAFNS Food Microbiology Committee.

 

 

 

Emergency Use of Microbial Methods of Detection by Industry - Alternative Routes Proving Fit for Purpose Expand

July 20, 2021, 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM ET

The food safety industry must ensure analytical methods designed to detect hazards are fit-for-purpose for their specific commodities. Meanwhile, the food industry is developing hundreds of new ingredients and products that will require screening for microbial hazards. With the ever-expanding diversity of these food products, what happens when a testing laboratory is presented with an urgent request for testing a matrix that was not included in the method's original validation study? The laboratory is asked to deviate from the intended use of the method by testing a different matrix or a different test portion size.

This situation can occur when a food manufacturer requires a faster turn-around time for product release than their standard method allows, when there is a sudden issue with the performance of a rapid test kit, or if a test kits from the manufacturer are backordered. Do these situations constitute an emergency? Arguably, this upset in product distribution could constitute an emergency in terms of the supply chain which is already under stress due to pandemic disruptions - with real effects on consumer well-being and the economy.

This roundtable will consider the key components required for a matrix validation and acceptable strategies for matrix validation that can be used in emergency situations. What approaches will allow expediency while assuring that the method is fit for purpose?

Invited panel participants:
• Deann Akins-Lewenthal, ConAgra Brands
• Patrick Bird, Technical Consultant, AOAC INTERNATIONAL
• Megan Brown, Eurofins
• Tom Hammack, US Food and Drug Administration
• Kelly Stevens, General Mills

 

This session is supported by the IAFNS Food Microbiology Committee.

 

 

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